Manchester United: Old Trafford Granted Permission to Install Rail Seating

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Manchester United have been granted permission to have barrier seats installed at Old Trafford.

The decision for rail standing was approved by Trafford Council, who held talks prior to the outbreak of Covid-19.

Old Trafford Gets Green Light for Rail Seating

Newest Ground to Introduce Rail Seats

Old Trafford will become the fifth British ground to have installed a rail seating zone. Parkhead, Spurs’ new ground and Molineux all have safe-standing.

Barrier seating will be used at Old Trafford from the 2020/21 season, and they hope to have it in place for when it is safe for fans to re-enter stadiums.

1,500 seats will be used for rail seating. This will be located in block J of Old Trafford to ensure they don’t block other supporters views.

If the use of barriers becomes a success, United will look to install more barrier seating around Old Trafford.

Managing director Stephen Arnold stated:”This announcement is the latest step in what has been a long journey with our fans.

“It may seem strange to talk about  stadium plans at this time, but football and our fans will return when it is safe, and our preparations for that must continue in the background.

Old Trafford Safe Standing Plans Approved by Fans

Standing in football grounds was banned following the tragic events of Hillsborough in 1989. 96 Liverpool fans lost their lives. The Taylor Report which followed, reccomended that stadiums in the top-two tiers of English Football to become all seater stadiums.

But over recent years campaign groups have called for standing to be allowed be allowed in stadiums.

In 2018, the Sports Ground Safety Authority, new guidelines allowed the use of rail seats in stadium.

The decision to have rail seating at Old Trafford has also been welcomed by the Manchester United supporters’ trust.

“While it is the club who formally requested the trial, it is the culmination of many years of work by MUST (previously SU & IMUSA) representatives stretching back three decades.”

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