Ejection Inspection, Week Six: Two Diamondbacks Ejected in Relatively Quiet Week

Diamondbacks Ejected

Two Diamondbacks Ejected in Relatively Quiet Week

Welcome to Week Six of Ejection Inspection! The premise and ground rules are detailed here. The condensed version: each ejection from the previous week (Thursday through Wednesday) is listed in a table. The author – a former player/coach/umpire – analyzes each ejection and assigns it an entertainment rating of one to five Weavers in honor of late Baltimore Orioles manager Earl Weaver. This week saw two normally mild-mannered Diamondbacks get ejected — Eduardo Escobar and Torey Lovullo. They are the first two Diamondbacks to get ejected in 2021.

(For a list of every article in this series, click here.)

There were six ejections in Week Six – three players and three managers.

Ejection Table

1 Sat 5/8 SD @SF T6 Jayce Tingler Mgr Nic Lentz HP Arguing balls/strikes
2 Sat 5/8 LAA LAD T7 Joe Maddon Mgr Brian Gorman 2B Arguing fair/foul replay decision
3 Sun 5/9 ARI @NYM T7 Eduardo Escobar 3B Manny Gonzalez HP Arguing balls/strikes
4 Sun 5/9 ARI @NYM T7 Torey Lovullo Mgr Manny Gonzalez HP Arguing balls/strikes
5 Wed 5/12 NYY @TBR T5 Clint Frazier LF Bill Miller HP Arguing balls/strikes
6 Wed 5/12 OAK @BOS T3 Ramon Laureano CF Ryan Wills HP Throwing equipment in dissent

 

Jayce Tingler, San Diego Padres Manager

When

Saturday, May 8, at San Francisco Giants, top of the sixth

Umpire

Nic Lentz (HP)

Description

Padres third baseman Manny Machado struck out on a called third strike against Kevin Gausman. Machado disagreed with two called strikes in that at-bat. As Machado fumed on his way back to the dugout, Tingler came out of the dugout to take the fall. Lentz held his hand up as a warning before Tingler reached him. Tingler kept walking, so Lentz dumped him. A brief conversation ensued before Tingler left the field. It didn’t get all that heated.

Understand the frustration?

Yes, but Tingler did not need to continue when Lentz held his hand up. Had he turned around and gone back to the dugout with Machado, it would have been fine. Every pitch in that at-bat was called correctly. This seems like a strange hill to die on.

Was the ejection justified?

Yes. Tingler left the dugout to argue balls and strikes and ignored a direct warning.

Entertainment Rating

One Weaver. Nothing memorable about it.

 

Joe Maddon, Los Angeles Angels Manager

When

Saturday, May 8, vs. Los Angeles Dodgers, top of the seventh

Umpire

Brian Gorman (2B)

Description

Dodgers right fielder DJ Peters hit a fly ball down the left field line. The third baseman and shortstop ran back to get it, but it was too deep. Left fielder Jon Jay ran a long way to get to it. He slid, with the ball hitting him while he was on the line. No TV camera angle showed whether the ball was fair or foul when it hit Jay. Third base umpire Adrian Johnson, who was in perfect position, ruled it fair. After replay, the call stood.

Maddon came out of the dugout to discuss the play. By rule, he was ejected for arguing a replay decision. After he was bounced, he went to second base to bark at Gorman before heading to the clubhouse.

Understand the frustration?

Not really. The only person on the field or in either dugout who knew for sure was Johnson.

Was the ejection justified?

Yes, since any manager who argues a replay decision is automatically ejected.

Entertainment Rating

One Weaver. This was dumb more than anything.

Eduardo Escobar, Arizona Diamondbacks Third Baseman
Torey Lovullo, Arizona Diamondbacks Manager

When

Sunday, May 9, at New York Mets, top of the seventh

Umpire

Manny Gonzalez (HP)

Description

On a 1–1 count against sinkerballer Jacob Barnes, Escobar squatted while taking a sinker over the middle of the plate. It appeared to be at least five inches below where the hollow of the knee would be while he is in his normal batting stance. Gonzalez called strike two. Escobar, who was 0-for-10 in the series at that point, angrily scolded his fellow Venezuelan in Spanish. On the next pitch, Escobar swung and missed for strike three. While heading to the dugout, he turned and pointed toward Gonzalez while saying more. Gonzalez ran him, and Escobar responded by turning around and sharply barking at Gonzalez more. A furious Lovullo held his hands apart as he reached Gonzalez to protest, leading to an immediate ejection. Lovullo continued pointing as he chewed Gonzalez out, holding up the number four at one point before storming to the clubhouse.

Understand the frustration?

Yes. Not only was strike two low, but the Diamondbacks were not playing well. This game wrapped up an 0–6 road trip. As a side note, the Diamondbacks don’t get ejected very often. For two Diamondbacks to get ejected in the same game shows how frustrated they truly were.

Was the ejection justified?

Despite the incorrect call, yes. Arguing balls and strikes is grounds for ejection, and Escobar did so forcefully and demonstrably. Leaving the dugout to argue them is automatic; Lovullo knew he was going to be tossed before he even left the dugout. However, after the game, he said he did so to stick up for Escobar on what he felt was an unfair strike two call.

Entertainment Rating

Three Weavers. This got heated. Escobar gave Gonzalez quite a verbal barrage in their native tongue. Plus, seeing Escobar this angry is rare. His only other career ejection came in 2018 while with the Minnesota Twins. Furthermore, Lovullo’s eyes got as big as saucers as he pointed at Gonzalez. Fun to watch all the way around.

Clint Frazier, New York Yankees Left Fielder

When

Wednesday, May 12, at Tampa Bay Rays, top of the fifth

Umpire

Bill Miller (HP)

Description

In a 0–0 game with the bases empty and one out, Frazier took a 3-2 cutter from junkballing lefty Ryan Yarbrough for a called third strike. It was in the upper and inner corner of the strike zone. Frazier turned around and started speaking to Miller, gesturing with his left hand for emphasis. Miller bounced him within seconds. Since Frazier’s head was down, no camera showed his lips, so it was impossible to read them.

Understand the frustration?

Any hitter would be frustrated for striking out, and Yarbrough’s arm angle and junkballing makes him terribly frustrating to face. So, yes.

Was the ejection justified?

By the book, yes, since he left his position to argue balls and strikes. It seemed like a quick hook, but it is impossible to be certain since we don’t know what Frazier said. Cameras and microphones could not pick it up.

Entertainment Rating

One Weaver. Yawn.

 

Ramon Laureano, Oakland Athletics Center Fielder

When

Wednesday, May 12, at Boston Red Sox, top of the third

Umpire

Ryan Wills (HP)

Description

With two out, a runner on first, and the game tied at one, Laureano took a 1–2 pitch for what he thought was ball two. Wills rung him up, angering Laureano. Laureano stood at the plate in disbelief, vented some frustration, threw his bat down, and heaved his helmet. Wills gave Laureano the heave-ho after he threw his helmet. Laureano returned to Wills and pointed in his face as he said a few f-bombs before heading to the clubhouse.

Understand the frustration?

Definitely. That pitch looked inside by a few inches.

Was the ejection justified?

Wills had to eject Laureano by rule when he slammed his helmet down in dissent. One piece of equipment can be a fine, but two must be an ejection, according to the league.

Entertainment Rating

Two Weavers. He got fired up, giving him more than a Weaver, but it didn’t last long enough to warrant more than two.

 

Leaderboard

After six weeks, here are the leaders.

Managers: Maddon and Tingler tied with two each
Players: 13 tied with one each
Team high: Cincinnati Reds, Kansas City Royals, Philadelphia Phillies, and San Diego Padres (three each).
Team low: Eight have not had anyone ejected yet.
Umpire: Angel Hernandez (four).

 

Read Week Seven here.

Evan Thompson played baseball as a youth and teenager. He also umpired between 1995 and 2004 and has coached at the high school level.

Main Photo:
Embed from Getty Images

Players/managers mentioned:
Earl Weaver, Eduardo Escobar, Torey Lovullo, Jayce Tingler, Joe Maddon, Clint Frazier, Ramon Laureano, Manny MachadoKevin Gausman, DJ PetersJon Jay, Jacob Barnes, Ryan Yarbrough


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