Bryson DeChambeau Wins 120th U.S. Open

Bryson DeChambeau

Bryson DeChambeau is a U.S. Open champion.

At 27 years old, DeChambeau captures his first major championship, shooting a final round 67 to win by six, despite hitting 23 of 56 fairways this week. DeChambeau was the only golfer under-par in the fourth round, the first time this occurred for a U.S. Open champion since Jack Fleck in 1955.

DeChambeau started the day two strokes back of 54-hole leader Matthew Wolff. Despite missing the fairway on the par-4 fourth hole, DeChambeau recorded his first birdie of the round, making a 13-foot putt.

With Wolff bogeying three of the first eight holes, DeChambeau took advantage. Even though he bogeyed the eighth hole, DeChambeau responded on the par-5 9th with an eagle. DeChambeau is the first since Tiger Woods at the 2008 U.S. Open to record multiple eagles in a week, en route to the major championship. The last golfer to record an eagle on the final round of a U.S. Open was Ralph Guldahl in 1937.

Since bogeying the 8th hole, DeChambeau went three-under holes 9 through 11, separating himself from Wolff and the rest of the field. Whether it was the eagle putt on the ninth or the birdie putt off the green on the par-4 11th, DeChambeau’s putting and approach game were sensational this week at Winged Foot. DeChambeau finished this week second in strokes gained: around the green and third in strokes gained: approach.

DeChambeau needed to make some critical putts the last six holes, including a five-foot, par save on the 13th. On the 14th hole, as Wolff made bogey, DeChambeau converted a 10-foot par putt to have a four-shot lead, which he never gave up.

DeChambeau gained 7.9 strokes on the field in the final round, just shy of 1973 U.S. Open champion Johnny Miller (a.k.a. The Miracle at Oakmont).

The now seven-time winner on the PGA Tour, DeChambeau became the first to shoot an under-par final round at Winged Foot; coming into Sunday, the average final-round score was 76.

With the victory, DeChambeau joins Tiger Woods and Jack Nicklaus as the golfers to win the U.S. Amateur, NCAA Championship, and U.S. Open.


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