Owen Power Scouting Report: 2021 NHL Draft #1

Owen Power Scouting Report

Welcome back to Top Shelf Prospects, the daily column that brings you the next crop of professional hockey players. Each day I will bring you a new player profile or topical article in the lead-up to the 2021 NHL Draft. Be sure to bookmark the site, follow me on Twitter, and spread the word for the site that will bring you analytical and critical profiles and scouting reports! Last Word On Hockey Prospects is your new headquarters for everything “NHL Draft”! We have a complete listing of our draft articles here. We start with our Owen Power Scouting Report. 

Owen Power was one of a trio of outstanding draft prospects who played for the University of Michigan this season. He put up three goals and 13 assists for 16 points in 26 games this season. Power was named to the Big Ten All-Rookie Team as well as the conference’s Second All-Star Team. Unfortunately, Power and his Michigan teammates were unable to participate in the NCAA Frozen Four tournament due to an outbreak of COVID-19.  It was a disappointing end to what was a promising season for the freshmen-laden team.

Power spent the previous two seasons with the Chicago Steel in the USHL, after being drafted seventh overall in the USHL Futures Draft. In 2019-20 he put up 12 goals and 28 assists for 40 points in 48 games before the season was shut down due to the pandemic. Power led the league in defence scoring, was named defenceman of the year, and was on the first all-star team. In 2018-19, he put 11 goals and 14 assists for 25 points in 52 games. He also added two points in 11 playoff games. Power was named to the USHL All-Rookie Team.

2021 NHL Draft #1: Owen Power Scouting Report

Defence — shoots Left
Born November 22nd, 2002 — Mississauga, Ontario
Height 6’05” — Weight 211 lbs [196 cm / 96 kg]

Skating

Owen Power is already 6’5″. For many tall players, the caveat of skates well “for his size” is used. This is not needed with Power. He is a very good skater and without the size caveat. His stride may not be the prettiest, but it is very effective. He has good speed in both directions. Power is able to reach top speed in just a few strides. His agility and edgework help him to keep the play in front of him. Strong, quick pivots allow Power to transition quickly from offence to defence and vice-versa. Power can add muscle to his frame, especially in his core and lower body. This will improve his balance and strength in board battles. However, he is already very strong in those areas in college. Added strength will only help him to transition to the pro game.

Offensive Game

Power has very good vision and passing skills. This allows him to start the breakout from his own end, or to quarterback the play in the opposing end. His agility, lateral movement and quick stick allow him to change angles and open up passing lanes in the defence. When he does, he is able to get that pass through to a teammate. Power can skate the puck out of dangerous areas in his own end and transitions well through the neutral zone but is not the type to try to take the puck himself. Instead, he moves the puck to an open forward, and if available will join the rush as a trailer in transition. He picks his spots though, careful not to overcommit and get caught defensively.

Power has a decent slap shot but could continue to work on his power. It is not a weak shot by any means, but he is also not going to be lining up for the hardest shot competition in the NHL any time soon either. With more muscle on his frame, this could improve. Power is more effective with his wrist shot which he can use as a trailer on the rush. He also sneaks in from the point and lets it go from the top of the faceoff circle on the power play. Power’s wrist shot has good power and accuracy. He also has a quick release.

Defensive Game

Power is also strong in his own end of the ice. He is a smart player who reads the play well and is well positioned. His skating allows him to maintain good gap control when defending against the rush. Power has good size and is willing to play a physical game in the corners and in front of the net. He is also not afraid to throw a hard hit if an attacker comes in with their head down. However, Power plays a disciplined game, he does not run around and get himself out of position looking for those big hits. Instead, he plays a cerebral game, looking to stop the opponent, get the puck back and start the transition game up the ice.

Projection and Comparison

Power has all the tools to be a number one defenceman. He has the size, skating, offensive game, defensive game, smarts and physical play that scouts look for in defenders, all in one package. There is some question about how high his ceiling is, as most of his traits are very good, but not excellent. However, there are not many weaknesses in his game either. With his last two seasons being shortened, as well as the fact that big defencemen sometimes need extra seasoning before making it to the NHL, Power could spend another year at Michigan and play for Team Canada at the World Juniors. Power’s game is reminiscent of Victor Hedman. This is just a stylistic comparison though and not one based on skill and ability.

Highlights

The following is a compilation of some of the highlight packages and features of Owen Power that are available on youtube.

Check back tomorrow for the next prospect on our draft board.

 

 

Owen Power Scouting Report Main Photo:

 


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