Robert Windsor 2020 NFL Draft Profile

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Robert Windsor Overview

Position: Defensive Tackle
Height: 6’4”
Weight: 290 Pounds
School: Penn State

NFL Combine Performance Data

40-Yard Dash: 4.9 Seconds
Bench Press: 21 Repetitions
Vertical Jump: 28.5 Inches
Broad Jump: 111 Inches
3-Cone Drill: 7.47 Seconds
20-yard Shuttle: 4.44 Seconds

Robert Windsor 2020 NFL Draft Profile

Arriving at Penn State from Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, Robert Windsor has been a rotational defensive lineman for the past four seasons. After a redshirt year, he began to work into his backup role, slowly adopting a bigger role throughout his career. He would earn recognition as an All-Big Ten honorable mention in 2018, and then third-team recognition in 2019.

Windsor never turned into a bigger, more robust tackle, and will enter draft day very far under the radar. He has been inconsistent from game to game and does not have consistent production inside of the game. There are highlights and streaks of highly productive play, but parts of his game need professional help. Hence, he will need to refine certain technical parts of his work to succeed in the NFL.

Strengths
– NFL caliber motor
– Gets back to the ball quickly if blown away
– Has quick turn and ability to see in space, leading to him running down ball carriers
– Rotational player who is willing to play where he is needed
– Model defensive line athleticism for modern NFL play

Weaknesses
– Gets stood up too often by double teams
– First step is awkward
– Reacts to offensive line sets; does not attempt to set the tone
– Highly inconsistent production from game-to-game
– Undersized for the interior; not quick enough to move outside

NFL Comparison: John McCargo

Teams with Need at Position: Pittsburgh Steelers, Houston Texans, Tennessee Titans, Atlanta Falcons, Carolina Panthers

Projection: Priority Free Agent

Bottom Line on Robert Windsor

Robert Windsor has the motor of an NFL interior lineman, and certainly the athleticism for the modern NFL era. The quick turnaround and ability to chase downplays is uncanny, and certainly a factor that NFL scouts will like. Although he is undersized in the interior, his frame can fill out with hearty weight room work. He has the traits and bottom line needed to succeed as an interior lineman.

However, while he has the traits to succeed, he needs to redefine several key fundamentals. His first step off the ball is awkward, and he falls into offensive line traps too often. He does not set the tone with technique, and because of that, is often unsettled at the beginning of games. The inconsistent production will be another knock; granted, that does not stem from motor, simply a lack of proper technique. His footwork may limit him in the end, but a team should find a nice spot for him inside of a summer training camp.

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