Top 5 cricketers who represented two countries

Eoin Morgan is the most well-known cricketer to have represented two countries in cricket.

Playing for two different nations as a cricketer

There is no doubt that being able to play for your country is the pinnacle in sport and particularly in cricket. However, there are some lucky cricketers who have represented two countries during their playing career. This has been due to various reasons such as: holding multiple citizenships, political events taking place and money-related issues. In this article we will explore our top 5 players that have pledged alliances for two nations.

The likes of Jofra Archer and Imran Tahir are very close to the list but just miss out, having only played for “A-teams” in their home countries, rather than internationally.

5. Kepler Wessels 

Kepler Wessels, England v South Africa, 1st Test, Lord’s, Jul 94. (Photo by Patrick Eagar/Popperfoto via Getty Images)

Kepler Wessels, who played for both South Africa and Australia, features at number five on our list. Overall, he played 40 Tests and 109 ODIs, representing Australia between 1982 and 1985 and then South Africa between 1991 and 1994, following their readmission to international cricket, post apartheid.

Wessels was born in Bloemfontein in South Africa and only decided to take an opportunity to join Kerry Packer’s World Series Cricket in the late 1970’s, at the age of 21. He scored 2788 Test runs at a batting average of 41 and 3367 ODI runs at a batting average of 34.

Kepler Wessels is number five on our list of “Top 5 cricketers who represented two different countries.”

4. Ed Joyce

MALAHIDE, IRELAND – MAY 14: Ed Joyce of Ireland during the fourth day of the international test cricket match between Ireland and Pakistan on May 14, 2018 in Malahide, Ireland. (Photo by Charles McQuillan/Getty Images)

Number four on our list is Ed Joyce, who was born in Ireland but also qualified to represent England. Joyce represented England between 2006 and 2007, having been included in both the Ashes squad Down Under and World Cup squad. An ambitious top-order batsman, Joyce played 1 Test, 78 ODIs and 15 T20Is throughout his career. He became the first Ireland batsman to face a ball in Test match cricket and also the first to be dismissed.

Overall, he scored over 2500 ODI runs at a batting average of 38. Joyce was a prolific run-scorer for Middlesex throughout his career.

Ed Joyce is number four on our list of “Top 5 cricketers who represented two different countries.”

 

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3. Luke Ronchi

Luke Ronchi represented two different countries in cricket, Australia and New Zealand.
BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND – JUNE 02: Luke Ronchi of New Zealand pulls a delivery from Pat Cummins to the fine leg boundary during the ICC Champions Trophy match between Australia and New Zealand at Edgbaston on June 2, 2017 in Birmingham, England. (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images)

Luke Ronchi is number three on our list, having played for both Trans-Tasmanian countries. He was originally born in New Zealand but made his international debut for Australia in 2008. However, due to the success of Brad Haddin, he received very few opportunities.

As a result, he announced that he would try and represent New Zealand again, in 2012. He ended up having a great career with the Kiwis, including reaching a Cricket World Cup final in 2015. Ronchi played 85 ODIs, scoring nearly 1400 runs.

Luke Ronchi is number three on our list of “Top 5 cricketers who represented two different countries.”

2. Dirk Nannes

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – FEBRUARY 27: Man of the Match Dirk Nannes of the Bushrangers makes his way to the boundary after bowling during the National One Day final match between the Victorian Bushrangers and the Tasmanian Tigers at Melbourne Cricket Ground on February 27, 2011 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Mark Dadswell/Getty Images)

The left-arm fast bowler, Dirk Nannes, features at number two on our list of cricketers who played for two countries. He represented both Australia and the Netherlands, playing in just 1 ODI and 17 T20Is. He was part of the famous Dutch victory against England at the 2009 World T20. Nannes was born in Australia but held Dutch citizenship through his parents.

He became a regular in domestic T20 cricket for nearly a decade, being a part of franchises such as the Chennai Super Kings, Sydney Thunder and Surrey.

Dirk Nannes is number two on our list of “Top 5 cricketers who represented two different countries.”

 

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1. Eoin Morgan

SOUTHAMPTON, ENGLAND – AUGUST 04: Eoin Morgan of England celebrates reaching his century during the Third One Day International between England and Ireland in the Royal London Series at Ageas Bowl on August 04, 2020 in Southampton, England. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images for ECB)

In first place is Eoin Morgan, comfortably the most successful player to have represented two countries in cricket. He was born in Ireland and made his debut for the nation in 2006. Morgan continued playing for Ireland until 2009 but he made his intentions clear that he wanted to represent England. The fact that his mother was English and he had a British passport made it easy for him to switch countries.

Morgan made his England debut against the West Indies in 2009 and featured in the successful World T20 campaign in the same year. However, his crowning moment came in 2019, when he captained England to their first-ever Cricket World Cup, beating New Zealand in the final.

He personally scored 371 runs in the tournament, at a batting average of 41. Overall, he has played 16 Tests, 243 ODIs and 102 T20Is. Eoin Morgan is currently England’s all-time leading run-scorer in ODI cricket, having amassed 7620 runs at a batting average of 39.48.

Eoin Morgan is number one on our list of “Top 5 cricketers who represented two different countries.”

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